Posted in climate, no fossil fuels

London just announced a climate emergency

Returned home from today’s City Council hearing. It was a discussion about the environmental health disparities & the impact of pollutants in at-risk neighborhoods, and organized by City Council’s Committee on Health and Human Services, chair Council member Cindy Bass, see resolution No. 180785.

students testifying on poverty, air quality & health in Philadelphia

Many people testified, including these:

  1. Dr Thomas Farley, Health Commissioner, City of Philadelphia
  2. Glen Abrams, Senior director of Sustainable Communities, PHS
  3. Mike Ewall, Founder & Director, Energy Justice Network
  4. Jerome Shabazz, Executive Director, Overbrook environmental education center
  5. Sue Edwards, Sierra Club PA & southeastern PA Group of the Sierra Club
  6. Terri Burgin, Climate Justice Fellow, POWER Interfaith
  7. Dr Walter Tsou, Executive Director, Physicians for Social Responsibility
  8. Tammy Murphy, Medical Advocacy Director, Physicians for Social responsibility
  9. Jennifer Clarke, Executive Director, The Public Interest Law center
  10. Lynn Robinson, Neighbors Against the Gas Plants
  11. Peter Winslow, Evolve Foundation
  12. Eric Marsh, parent
  13. Karen Melton, citizen
  14. Alexa Ross, Philly Thrive
  15. Pat Libbey
  16. and more that I missed!

I, Meenal Raval, spoke up at the end, essentially this:

London just announced a climate emergency.  The health impacts we heard about today are symptoms of our fossil fuel addiction — our children are the canaries in the coal mines.

Let’s accept it. There’s no future for the teens who were here today. I could have told them about the students in Sweden and Australia are on a #ClimateStrike. Young people in their 20s are rising up for a #GreenNewDeal.

Philadelphia, too, must declare a climate emergency. We need to set up a Committee on the Climate Crisis, develop a Green New Deal for our City, and reduce our greenhouse gas emissions ASAP!

Media coverage from the day;

 

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Posted in ban plastics, electrify everything, no fossil fuels, solar, transit

We can do it!

Testimony at State of the Environment hearing held by Philadelphia Council’s Committee on the Environment, led by Council member Blondell Reynolds Brown, November 29 2018 by Meenal Raval / meenal.raval [at] gmail.com / @meenal19119. Video recording of the entire hearing found here, starting at 1:14:00


What is the most pressing environmental issue facing us? Some seem to think it’s litter. Or storm water. Or air quality. These are all symptoms of the global climate crisis and our addiction to fossil fuels. And, it seems, we have only 10-12 years to kick our habit!

Some say we, the public, haven’t shown enough outrage about the IPCC report, the report that alerts us to this 10-12 year timeline. Some say we, the environmental groups, are too polite and rational. So I’d like to state that we are indeed enraged, outraged, and yes, fearful, for all our futures; that people come to us, asking what we should be doing. So those of us leading the climate movement in Philadelphia, people like me, know we’re in this for the long haul. And that we need to remain calm and help solve the crisis we’ve gotten ourselves info. So…

Meenal offering testimony on 11/29/18

What are fossil fuels? Coal, Oil and Gas. I’d also like to list their derivatives — gasoline, diesel, and plastics.

How do we use fossil fuels? Most visible are our cars, trucks & buses — combusting gasoline and diesel. Not as visible is the equipment in our basements – the boilers, furnaces and water heaters. Also invisible are the distant power plants burning coal, oil and gas to generate electricity.

So, how do we get off fossil fuels? We decide to stop spending on anything that uses fossil fuels. We do this each time we make a decision, which is what you all do on a daily basis!

This means planning for every new car, truck & bus to be electric, starting today.

It means when the boiler goes out on that cold morning, everyone knows that that oil or gas boiler will be replaced with an electric option — whether for our homes, our schools, or our workplaces. The homeowner, the contractor, the utility — all of us need to be aware of, and repeat, this same message. Currently, contractors are insisting on gas options even when the decision maker asks about electric option.

And when the hot water tank springs a leak in the basement; the same. Opt for an electric option, whether it’s got a tank or an on-demand feature.

And when there’s talk of subsidizing a limping refinery or partnering to liquify natural gas, the decision is simple. We just say no.

It means planning for our municipally owned utility, PGW, to transition away from selling gas (another fossil fuel) to doing something else. Like what?  It could be installing geothermal projects. It could be air sealing and insulating all our buildings. It could be replacing all gas appliances with electric ones. We’ll find a way, together. Otherwise we’ll all be in deep water. Yup… a little climate humor.

Next up — Plastics. Though not directly contributing to our greenhouse gas emissions, most of the plastic we use and dispose of ends up in our air (most trash gets incinerated) or our water ways. From the Wissahickon Creek to the Schuylkill River to the Atlantic Ocean, you’ll find plastic choking off all life.

Though very useful for things like eyeglasses, we need to curtail the use-once and throw-away plastics — items like forks and spoons, take out containers, plastic bags, and yes, disposable water bottles. I hear Councilman Squilla wants to enact a plastic bag ban; so I’ll be working with him on that! 

You may ask how we’d fund this rapid scale effort? Each day I get alerts about another institution divesting — shifting funds invested in fossil fuel companies to clean energy companies. To issuing green bonds. To setting up a public bank. We can do all this in Philly~ 

This sounds like an insurmountable task, I realize. But I’m living proof that it can be done. I live in an all-electric house, with an electric bike and an electric car, all charged by the soon-to-be-installed-solar panels on my roof. All emitting zero greenhouse gases, so all emissions free. If only the bus I rode to get here was also electric…

Perhaps we need to create a new committee, say, the Committee on the Climate Crisis. This could parallel the House Select Committee at the Federal Level being led by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez with the Green New Deal.

Who wants to step up to this, the Committee on the Climate Crisis? We could work on one climate-related policy each week, to deliberate over and implement.

The physicians say we need to act. The scientists say we need to act. Yesterday, I was at a workshop with the Bar Association, and learned that even the lawyers say we need to act. Let’s focus on the task at hand. We can do it!


 

Posted in ban plastics, no fossil fuels

The Right to Bear [Refillable] Water Bottles

The Climate Crisis — It’s asking us to cut out our dependency on fossil fuels. Not only the extraction, transportation and combustion of these fuels, but also our dependency on all the stuff made from fossil fuels — think plastics, especially single use plastics such as the ubiquitous water bottle.

Last week, when I went to the scheduled meeting of the Philadelphia City Council, I was met with the security team insisting I empty my refillable water bottle. This is something I carry to all public meetings. One, because I like staying hydrated. Two, because I don’t believe in paying for water. Three, because our waterways are clogged with the remnants of our single use plastic addiction. And four, to encourage conversation on the subject.

Settling into a seat at Council chambers with my now-empty container, I noticed other visitors sipping their coffee from styrofoam cups, and drinking water from single use water bottles. Why was I singled out? Not as a role model, but as a trouble-maker who couldn’t read the “No Food or Drink” sign? A sign that no one present was able to explain the reasoning for.

photo: Meenal Raval

Yes, there was a water station inside Council chambers, but beside this were, again, single use plastic cups. Cups which I, and many others, will not drink from because they’re made from plastic.  Indeed, the local Sierra Club is forming a no-plastics committee to ban single use plastics in Philadelphia. The Weavers Way Environment Committee has a Plastic Reduction Task Force; see here, here and here about what they’re up to, plus their petition to the co-op’s main supplier to switch to reusable pallet wrap. The Trash Academy, a project of Mural Arts Philadelphia, is working on a plastic bag ban in Philadelphia, in collaboration with Clean Water Action and the City of Philadelphia’s Zero Waste & Litter Cabinet.  

Outside Philadelphia, there’s Narberth making some news:

And in West Chester, the mayor pitches plan to limit use of plastic bags at checkout. Across the pond, the European Parliament votes for ban on single-use plastic.

Our PHL Council could start by

  1. photo: Meenal Raval, location: 18th Floor, 1515 Arch St, Philadelphia

    Replacing plastic cups with paper cups at the water cooler inside Council chambers. 

  2. Replace the water cooler with a water bottle refilling station, like at most schools and libraries, which would be connected to city water instead of needing 5 gallon water jugs to be trucked in.
  3. Encourage the security team to block single use bottles from entering the Council chambers.
  4. Have each Councilmember sport a refillable water container, building on the effect of appropriate role modeling, showing how easy this could be. 

Want to help with this effort? Contact me!

 

Posted in electrify everything, no fossil fuels, transport

Electrifying it all — starting today

Today marks the long awaited announcement from Philadelphia’s Office of Transportation and Infrastructure Systems, the release of  Connect: Philadelphia’s Strategic Transportation Plan.

Connect is meant to guide the City in creating a transportation system that benefits everyone. A transportation system that is safe, affordable, accessible, and reliable at moving Philadelphians, visitors, and commerce so neighborhoods thrive, people are healthy, and the economy grows.

Though I’ve yet to read the plan, you can view the data book, download the executive summary, or the full plan, here.

electrification of all modes of transport

Later today, the newsfeed showed

When Paris banned cars with even-numbered plates for a day in 2014, pollution dropped by 30%. So last year, it led with plans to ban all petrol cars from the city by 2030 in pollution crackdown. Since then, it seems other cities have taken Paris’ lead, and to date, 13 cities that are starting to ban [gasoline] cars.  The future is today, if we can grab it!

Posted in no fossil fuels, solar

Heating our Philadelphia row home without fossil fuels

As we gut a Philadelphia row home, we’re also making plans for it to become a frack-free house, a phrase popularized by the architecture firm Bright Common. This translates to: No gas appliances delivering fracked gas from Western Pennsylvania into our home. Everything that used gas will be replaced with electric options.

So far, we’ve happily removed the gas oven / range and the associated gas pipes out of the kitchen. For cooking, we’ve selected an electric stove. And already have other electric appliances to supplement this: toaster oven, microwave, induction cooktop and crockpot.

We’ve also begun removing the cast iron radiators in each room, along with the associated hot water pipes coming up from the boiler in the basement. 

For heating the house, we realize the row home design that abounds in Philadelphia means we are tucked in between two neighbors. The only heat loss would be from the exterior walls. We’re therefore building out the walls by 4” so that we can pack in insulation. Matus Windows, a local company with a good reputation, will replace the windows. After this, the exterior walls should be draft free.

We’ll still need a heating system. Looking at our options, we’d heard that mini-split ductless systems are the most efficient. So we called in a recommended HVAC company to advise us on this. They were fixed on one brand: Mitsubishi, and that’s what was priced for us, a 20,000 Btu system. They were unable to advise us how much electricity this would use. And we learned that our favorite thermostat, the programmable and self-learning Nest, would not be compatible.

What we did learn was that one outside compressor and 2 inside air handlers would do the job, offering us 2 zones to heat and cool. I’d hoped the compressor could stay in the garage or basement, spaces with the least temperature swings during the summer and winter, but was advised this was against the building codes in our area.

I’ve since learned that 12,000 Btu equals 1 ton. Also, that estimates vary on the area this would “condition”; from 400 – 500 sf, and up to 800 – 1000 sf. Most sites mention ductless mini-splits when discussing indoor cooling, but since we prefer to cool off with ceiling fans and have rarely used air conditioning, our focus is on using the mini-splits for wintertime heating.

Per one site (7 tips to get more from mini split heat pumps), we also learned to

  • plan for average lows, not record lows.
    • For Philadelphia, the mean minimum is 6.4F, with record low of -11F. We should plan for 6F.
  • plan on using space heaters during extreme cold spells.
    • We’ve got plenty of these from when we used a gas boiler to ramp up indoor heat in the mornings, and then, like task lighting, used space heaters in the specific rooms with people.
  • plan for outdoor compressor to draw air from indoor space.
    • This makes so much sense, since the interior air has less temperature fluctuation. The one installer we called advised us this isn’t to code. I’ll have to see what the next company says.
  • position interior air handler about 18” off floor
    • This too was a surprise. Most mini-split installations I’ve seen are mounted closer to the ceiling. But perhaps that’s because they were designed for cooling the space.
  • an actual example of a 3/4 ton (or 9,000 Btu) system suffices for a  1,500 sf home in Massachusetts, and uses about 1,500 kWh per year.
    • A system this size (9,000 Btu) should definitely work for our 650 sf row home in Philadelphia. Note that this is much smaller than the size recommended by the first HVAC company (20,000 Btu).
    • Assuming it will use proportionately less electricity, we estimate the annual usage to be 650 kWh per year.
  • select higher HSPF (heating season performance factor), which is measured in Btu / Wh.

The buying guide from Consumer Reports suggests we also consider noise levels and demand defrost options. The recommended noise level is about 7 decibels. The demand defrost option is to keep icicles from forming on the outdoor compressor fans, which sounds worthwhile.

My initial reason for asking annual electricity usage from the HVAC company was because we’re also planning to install rooftop solar. We wanted to know that the rooftop system would not only suffice for our lighting, electronics, cooking, and hot water needs, but also for our heating and cooling needs.

Chatting with Dara Bortman of Exact Solar (an area residential solar installer), I learned that there were solar mini split systems out there, powered by either DC from the panels or AC from the grid. The system I’ve got my mind set on is the unit by HotSpot, sold as an air conditioner, i.e. cooling needs.

This 35 SEER system cools by using 11,500 Btu per hour, or about 328 W (11,500 / 35).  Assuming we might only need cooling for 8 days, about 8 hours per day, the electricity used for the season would be

328 W x (8 days / season) x (8 hours / day) = 20,992 Wh, or 20.9 kWh per cooling season.

Of more interest to us is the heating season. This 10 HSPF system heats by using 13,000 Btu per hour, or about 1300 W (13,000 / 10).  Assuming we need heat for 5 months, 8 hours per day, the seasonal electricity usage would be

1300 W x (5 months / season) x (30 days / month) x (8 hours / day) = 1,560,000 Wh = 1560 kWh per season

Note that we had estimated 650 kWh per heating season, based on the Massachusetts example. It could be they like the house a little cooler. Or it could be we don’t really need to run a heating system for 8 hours per day. The other difference is that their 9,000 Btu Fujitsu system has an HSPF of 12.5, whereas the Hotspot’s HSPF is 10.0.

My concerns are

  • Noise – the indoor noise level is stated to be 26 dB at the low setting, while 7.6 dB is recommended. Would this feel too loud?
  • Placement of compressor – I would like the heat exchanger to be in the basement,  not outside in extreme temperatures. If it must be outside, we’re thinking of mounting it over the garage door, with the 3 panels above as a protective awning.
  • Circuit load – Could I have the heat going, while making tea or taking a shower on a cold morning? Without blowing a fuse? The stove is rated for 30 Amps, the tankless hot water system at 60 Amps, and the mini-split heating system at 5.3 Amps. All together, about 95 Amps. Well within the 100 Amp panel in the garage.
  • Thermostat – It’s unclear how the setback thermostat works for this. I plan to keep the house cool at night, and expect a thermostat to warm up the house before I wake up.

Thoughts?

Posted in no fossil fuels

Electricity for the house. From Renewables, please!

You understand all the reasons to switch to renewables: the climate pickle we’ve got ourselves into, and the resultant unbreathable air from burning fossil fuels like coal, oil and gas to generate our electricity.

You also understand the need for a rapid transition to renewable energy, particularly in the electricity sector. But… you may live in an apartment, a condo, or just a house with a shady roof — all of which made it impossible to invest in solar panels on your own roof. Or, though your roof gets tons of sun, you may not have the funds to invest in rooftop solar.

What do do?

  • We suggest you switch your electricity supplier to The Energy Co-op, choosing their EcoChoice 100 product.
  • We also suggest you join us: The Northwest Philly Solar Co-op for a $25 annual fee. We offer tips like this, and also one-on-one energy efficiency help.

Why?

The Energy Co-op is a local, well established company, spun off from Weavers Way Co-op. Their EcoChoice 100 product offers 100% renewable electricity, 99% from PA wind farms and 1% from solar. With a fixed rate, you won’t get surprised 6 months from now! Other companies may offer cheaper options, but most promote renewables in other states, and all appear gimmicky to us. Don’t take my word for it. Read Marion & Dave Brown’s experience; then read Chrys Brown’s experience, both shared in the Weavers Way Shuttle. Then, buy local!

How?

Go to The Energy Co-op’s website.. Or call their only office, in Center City Philadelphia, where someone from their small staff will assist you with the switch. Their number is 215.413.2122. Tell them Meenal sent you!

Now to get my own mother to switch back to The Energy Co-op after someone came to her door and presented a gimmick…


Originally published on NW Philly Solar Co-op’s site, here.

Posted in banking, clean renewable energy, divest, no fossil fuels, pipelines, solar, transition

Marcellus Shale – A Blessing or a Curse?

Our state has been blessed, some say. Possibly cursed, say some others. I’m talking about the abundant gas reserves in the Marcellus Shale. Cursed because of issues during Extraction, Transportation & Consumption.

Extraction is also known as hydraulic fracturing or fracking. When chemicals are forced into the ground, they contaminate the water table, affecting the well water of rural townships. As the gas is forced out & captured, there are leaks. Leaks that affect the local air quality and detrimental to the health & property values. The same methane leaks are an important contributor to climate change, worse even than carbon dioxide. 

Transportation of fracked gas is typically by pipelines. Pipelines that are known to leak or explode, with cleanup expenses left to the taxpayers. Rights for these pipelines, going thru wetlands, woodlands and private property, are gained via eminent domain in the name of public utility.  but are really for private gain by fossil fuel companies. Permit applications are shoddy, and fragmented construction begins in communities with the least resistance. Communities are not compensated for the devastation, nor the liability.

There are several pipeline developments, all headed to or through the greater Philadelphia area – the Mariner East 2 pipeline slated to carry fracked gas liquids from west to east, ending up in nearby Delaware County, and destined for export, to be made into plastic bags in Europe. How does this qualify the pipeline builders to claim in the courts that they’re a public utility? 

Then there’s the Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline destined to travel north to south, going through farmland in Lancaster County. And the PennEast pipeline thru Bucks County into New Jersey. And smaller segments across the Delaware River (which supplies the drinking water for 15M people), and into the Pinelands in South Jersey.

gas burning from a kitchen gas stove

Which leads us to …Consumption. The pipeline going thru the Pinelands is headed to a gas power plant, where the fracked gas will be burned to generate electricity. Much like the SEPTA gas plant locally in Nicetown that 350 Philly and others are fighting. Advertised as clean burning at point of ignition, the industry ignores the devastation left in its wake. 

Once you realize that natural gas is the same as methane, and that methane is a more potent greenhouse gas than even carbon dioxide (86 times), you’ll agree, it’s no longer clean burning.

Who’s doing this extraction, transportation & building up the large scale demand for fracked gas? The same companies behind the Dakota Access Pipeline:  

Sunoco Logistics, Williams Company, Energy Transfer Partners

Who’s funding these companies?

Wells Fargo, Bank of America, Citibank, Citizens Bank, HBSC Bank, TD Bank

And many of us thru our personal accounts, our investments and our retirement plans.

It’s time to #divest and #reinvest all of our funds into clean energy from #solar and #wind, and leave the Marcellus Shale reserves resting safely underground.


Initially presented at Indivisible NW Philly meeting on March 12 2017.

Posted in no fossil fuels

Ask the electors

I just went to asktheelectors.org, and wrote the following. Please write in your own words why they shouldn’t select Donald Trump as our President.


Subject: please consider the popular vote and vote with climate awareness

Dear Elector,

My name is Meenal Raval from Philadelphia, PA.

A presidential election like the recent one is exactly why our forefathers created the electoral college. Please consider the popular vote when you select our next president.

As the Dalai Lama said: “We are the generation with the awareness of a great danger. We are the ones with the responsibility and the ability to take steps of concrete action, before it is too late” to act on climate.

The wrong president will truly spell doom for our entire planet.

Thank you for your time and consideration, I appreciate and respect the role you serve in our electoral process.

Sincerely,

Meenal


 

Posted in no fossil fuels, pipelines

a perspective on Standing Rock

Transcript of the incredibly honest and moving segment by Lawrence O’Donnell that aired Aug 25, 2016 – Rewrite: the Protests at Standing Rock. In just over 4 minutes, Lawrence explains why a protest by Native Americans in North Dakota reminds us of the history America always tries to forget.


“Dakota means friend. Friendly. The people who gave that name to the Dakotas have sadly never been treated as friends.

The people whose language was used to name the Dakotas, Minnesota, Iowa, Oklahoma, Ohio, Connecticut, Massachusetts and other states.

The Native American tribes, the people who were here before us, long before us, have never been treated as friends. They have been treated as enemies, and dealt with more harshly than any other enemy in any of this county’s wars.

After all of our major wars we signed peace treaties. And lived by those treaties. After World War II, when we made peace with Germany, we then did everything we possibly could to rebuild Germany. No Native American tribe has ever been treated as well as we treated Germans after World War II.

Donald Trump and his supporters now fear the country invaded by foreigners who want to change our way of life. A fear that Native Americans have lived with every day for over 500 years.

The original sin of this country is that we invaders shot & murdered our way across the land killing every Native American we could and making treaties with the rest.

This country was founded on genocide, before the word genocide was invented. Before there was a war crimes tribunal in the Hague.

When we finally stopped actively killing Native Americans for  the crime of living here before us, we then proceeded to violate every treaty we made with the tribes. Every single treaty. We piled crime on top of crime on top of crime against the people whose offense against us was simply that they lived where we wanted to live.

We don’t feel the guilt of those crimes because we pretend they happened a very long time ago, in ancient history and we actively suppress the memories of those crimes but there are people alive today whose grandparents were in the business of killing Native Americans. That’s how recent these crimes are.

Every once in a while, there is a painful & morally embarrassing reminder as there is this week in North Dakota near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation where hundreds of people have gathered & camped out in opposition to an interstate pipeline being built from North Dakota to Illinois.

The protest is being led by this county’s original environmentalists. For 100’s of years, they were our only environmentalists. The only people who thought that land & rivers should be preserved in their natural state, the only people who thought a mountain or a prairie or river could be a sacred place.

Yesterday a federal judge heard arguments from the tribes, against the federal government’s approval of the pipeline and said he will deliver his decision on whether the pipeline can proceed next month.

There are now over 90 tribes gathered in protest of that pipeline. That protest will surely continue even if the judge allows construction to proceed.

And so we face the prospect next month, of the descendants of the first people to ever set foot on that land, being arrested by the descendants of the invaders who seized that land. Arrested for trespassing.

That we still have Native Americans left in this country to be arrested for trespassing on their own land is testament not to the mercy of the genocidal invaders who seized and occupied their land, but to the stunning strength, and the 500 years of endurance and the undying dignity of the people who were here long before us. The people who have always known what is truly sacred in this world.”


What can you do?

Posted in no fossil fuels, solutions

Refueling our EV

So we got ourselves a electric vehicle, the smart fortwo coupe 13507087_10207747020931794_8761258531375557893_nwith electric drive, or the Smart ED.  Tiny, and powered by plugging into our outdoor outlet, which we’re led to believe, is supplied by mainly by Pennsylvania wind farms.

Refueling our EV has been an education about the car’s battery capacity, the charger and the charging rate.

The Smart ED has a battery capacity of 17.6 kW,

It also comes with an EVSE charger that you can plug into any 110V outlet. A button on this charger allows you to select between 8A and 12A based on the circuit.

The maximum charging rate for the Smart ED is 3.3 kW per hour. Most other cars, such as the Nissan Leaf, are designed to charge at a faster rate (6.6 kW per hour), while the Tesla charges at 19.2 kW per hour, almost 6 times faster.

Therefore, the theoretically fastest this car can charge is 5.3 hours on a 220V outlet or 10.6 hours on a 110V outlet.

capacity / rate = 17.6 kW / 3.3 kWh = 5.3 hours

If we’re to use a standard 110V outlet and the given charger, it would take between 13 and 20 hours to fully charge our car based on the amps selected.

110V x 8A = 0.88 kW per hour
17.6 kW / 0.88 kWh = 20 hours

110V x 12A = 1.32 kW per hour
17.6 kW / 1.32 kWh = 13 hours

If we installed a 220V outlet, and purchased a 220V charger, our refueling rate would go down to 6.6 hours.

220V x 12A = 2.64 kW per hour
17.6 kW / 2.64 kWh = 6.6 hours

For now, the 13-hour refueling rate seems adequate.

In the few days we’ve used this car, people have asked us another question. About the cost to refuel our EV. Our PECO bill (with electricity generation from The Energy Co-op’s EcoChoice 100 program) shows us paying about 18 cents per kWh. A full recharge (17.6 kW x 0.18 per kWh) would be $3.17 and take you 75 miles. That’s 4 cents per mile.

13576707_10209568355550269_2600144925251380969_oNot a bad price for declaring independence from the gas pump. Half the length, just as much fun. #fossilfuelfreefun, powered by the wind and the sun.